EVENT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

“HOW CULTURE SHAPES THE CLIMATE CHANGE DEBATE”

"How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate" by Andrew J. Hoffman

Why do some people deny climate change science? And how should people who care deeply about addressing climate change talk with deniers? In this keynote address, Andrew Hoffman, Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan, addresses those questions, drawing on his recent book How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate. Hoffman synthesizes insights from sociology, psychology, and political science to explain why Americans interpret science in such divergent ways. Polarized though we are, Hoffman highlights successful efforts to narrow the partisan divide around climate. These examples offer lessons anyone can use to have more open and meaningful conversations about climate change.

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required.
Thurs, Feb 10, 2022 at 7:00 pm
Porter Byrum Welcome Center
REGISTER NOW
EVENT OPEN TO FACULTY

“THE ENGAGED SCHOLAR”

"The Engaged Scholar" by Andrew J. Hoffman

Society and democracy are threatened by the fall of fact. Rigorous analysis of facts, the hard boundary between truth and opinion, and fidelity to reputable sources of factual information are all in alarming decline. A 2018 report published by the RAND Corporation labeled this problem "truth decay" and laid the challenge of fixing it at the academy’s door. Unfortunately, academia is busy handling its own existential crisis—a crisis of relevance. Scholarship rarely moves very far beyond the walls of the academy and is certainly not accessing the primarily civic spaces it needs to reach in order to mitigate truth corruption. In this talk, Hoffman draws upon existing literature and personal experience to bring attention to the problem of academic insularity—where it comes from and where, if left to grow unchecked, it will go—and argues for the emergence of a more publicly and politically engaged scholar. His is a call to make that path toward public engagement more acceptable and legitimate for those who do it; to enlarge the tent to be inclusive of multiple ways that one enacts the role of academic scholar in today's world.

This event is free and open to Faculty
Fri, Feb 11, 2022 from 12:00 - 1:00 pm
EVENT OPEN TO STUDENTS

“MANAGEMENT AS A CALLING”

"Management as a Calling" by Andrew J. Hoffman

Markets are the only human institution capable of driving rapid and globally scalable innovation, the kind of innovation we need in order to mitigate climate change, habitat destruction, and the social misery that attend them. But markets will not do this automatically. Only skillful managers operating in all corners of markets—in business, government, and non-profit organizations—can make markets work for planetary health and justice. This presentation will outline a vision for organizational management oriented toward that goal. It will discuss management, especially but not exclusively business management, as a service-oriented calling. This presentation will invite attendees to recognize and heed that calling in their personal and professional contexts. 

This event is free and open to Students
Fri, Feb 11, 2022 from 1:30 - 2:30 pm
ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Andrew J. Hoffman

Professor of Management & Organizations
Professor of Environment and Sustainability
Holcim (US), Inc. Professor of Sustainable Enterprise

Andy Hoffman is the Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan; a position that holds joint appointments in the Stephen M. Ross School of Business and the School for Environment and Sustainability.  Andy is a leader in using organizational, network and strategic analyses to assess the implications of environmental issues for business, and has published 18 books and over 100 articles and book chapters on the topic. Prior to academics, Andy worked for the US Environmental Protection Agency (Region 1), Metcalf & Eddy Environmental Consultants, T&T Construction & Design, and the Amoco Corporation.

EDUCATION

  • PhD Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1995
  • MS Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1991
  • BS University of Massachusetts At Amherst 1983